Another Lean Manufacturing Video

I’m continuing my search for good lean manufacturing videos.  I’ll tell you the truth, there aren’t a lot.  The most interesting and valuable tend to be “a look at the factory” type videos.

In that light, I think you’ll like this one.  As was the case with the Fast Cap video, work place organization is highlighted.

Steering Committee Blues

A central element of any of my lean manufacturing implementations is the establishment of a Steering Committee.  The Steering Committee usually comprises the top leadership in the organization in which I’m working.

Steering Committee Blues

We always hope for Steering Committees that get fully engaged in the lean project, eagerly discussing issues and tossing around ideas.  What we get, too often, are Steering Committees that don’t steer.

Continue reading Steering Committee Blues

How to Implement Lean Manufacturing: More Overview

Last time, we laid out the five steps to implementing lean manufacturing and gave a bit of an overview as to the whole program.  Let’s work on that a bit more.  We’ll jump into the specifics of the five phases next post.

Over the years, I’ve found that clients often know about the various concepts and tools surrounding lean.  I rarely get asked, “What’s this ‘heijunka’ thing I’ve heard about?”  or “I don’t know much about 5S.  Can you explain it to me?” Rather, the more common questions are “How do I get started?” and “What do I do next?”

To tell you the truth, the best answer to those questions is, “We can’t really be sure where to start or what to do next until we dig in and talk more about your specific circumstances.”  I’ve found, though, that answer doesn’t do much to comfort prospective (or existing) clients.  They’re eager to hear the program.  Mind you, they’re often very willing to be flexible once the program gets started.  Heck, they are the ones that generate the need for flexibility once it gets started.  But, at the front end, they need to hear that the implementation has a beginning, an end, and a finite number of steps to get between the two.

Just as if you were building a house.  You wouldn’t be comforted if the contractor said, “We’ll start talking about your needs and interests and see what develops.”  You’d want to see a blueprint.  That’s what the five steps represent: a blueprint for implementing lean methods and tools.

Best Lean Manufacturing Video I’ve Seen in Awhile

Here’s a Youtube video that I think you’ll enjoy.  Truth be told, I don’t see a lot of lean manufacturing videos (I need to look for more good ones) but I stumbled across this one and have shown it to a few clients.

It does a very good job of illustrating the value and benefit of work place organization and visual factory.

In looking back to find this video, I see there are several others by Fast Cap about lean.  I need to check those out, as well.  In the meantime, enjoy this one.

Comments to Posts

You know, I get hundreds of comments to the posts I write here.  (At the moment, theres a backlog of more than 1400 comments.)  The problem is, all of them (so far as I can tell) are spam.

That means that there might be a few legitimate comments that I’m not seeing that aren’t getting posted because I don’t want to wade through the backlog.  Especially given that, within a few days, it would be right back where it is now.

I’m going to figure this out eventually (I think there’s a way of attaching one of those Captcha widgets that make you type in the fuzzy numbers), but until then, you probably won’t see your comment below a post.

I’m always eager to hear what you have to say, though, so, for the time being,  use the contact page anytime you just have to respond to a post.

Compensate Workers for their Value Added

I found a good article by another practioner, Bill Waddell, at his Manufacturing Leadership blog.  I’ve never met Bill but he’s a good writer and I used to check out another blog he wrote for (and maybe still does), Evolving Excellence., to see what he had written lately.  He and I went a few rounds in the comment section of some of his posts (I tend to have a more sanguine view of labor organizations and the public sector than he does) but his articles were always thoughtful and well written.  (He, like me, can be very tough on management and leadership.)

This article is a good example.  When I saw the title, The Irrelevance of Minimum Wage, I was ready to go another round or two with him.  Then I read the article and found myself in complete agreement.

He rightly calls manufacturers to task:

“The same thing is true with the braying from the old school manufacturers about their perceived inability to find skilled workers. All depends on the skills. When they see workers as merely that “set of hands” they are right. Lean companies, however, see it a bit differently…”

Bill correctly points out that too many companies see their workers, not as sources of strategic advantage, but simply as costs that need to be minimized.

 

 

How to Implement Lean Manufacturing In Five (not so easy) Steps.

OK, let’s get started…again.

The five, not so easy, steps to implement lean manufacturing are:

  1. Strategy and Spread the Word
  2. Sort and Shine
  3. Straighten and See
  4. Simplify and Solve
  5. Standardize and Sustain

You’ll notice the alliteration around the S’s…that’s to make it all easier to remember.  I hope.

Truth be told, they aren’t really steps so much as they are stages or phases.  And they don’t have to be done in the order listed.  Except for Strategy and Spread the Word,  That one has to go first.

I’ve been using this model for a few years now.  Here’s why I like it:

  1. It’s an approach that’s easy to use to explain to others what we’ll do and how we’ll do it. It also facilitates keeping track of where we’ve made progress and what’s left to accomplish.
  2. The approach is flexible and customizable just about any situation I run into.  I’ve used this in small and large settings.
  3. It provides appropriate “buckets” to put all the tools and tactics I use.  By that I mean, each tool, each tactic has “someplace to go”.  5S? Phases 2 and 3.  Visual Factory?  Phase 3.  Value Stream Mapping? Phase 4.  Leader Standard Work?  Phase 5.  You get the idea, I think.
  4. And, finally, it formats nicely for a series of blog posts!

 

 

 

New Name for the Blog: Lean Manufacturing Update

You’ll notice I’ve changed the name of the blog to Lean Manufacturing Update. The reason is shamelessy commercial…I’m hoping it shows up better in web searches. After all, if you were looking for info on “lean manufacturing”, would it occur to you to search on “agile manufacturing”? Exactly.

I still like the term “agile” better than I do “lean”. But I hope I’ll get to say that to more people by changing the name of my blog.